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Design philosophy


Design Philosophy

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Design philosophy


Design Philosophy

In order to move fast on technology design and development we’ve developed rules and methods that are different from traditional large aerospace concerns.

Rule #1

Nothing is impossible (unless it violates the laws of physics).

Rule #2

Bend the laws of physics to the extent possible..

Rule #3 

Brainstorm it, build it, and get it out into the field for test as rapidly as possible
(you only truly learn if it works by testing it in the real deal).

Rule #4

Design it as if your life depended on it because it does! A big part of our program is development of
manned systems and our staff are personally involved in field testing
and use of our designs in extremely hazardous environments.

Rule #5

Develop technology we need in the least possible time for the best price.

 
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We Are Developing the Critical Technologies

Shackleton Energy Company has developed a comprehensive plan of action identifying all the
critical technology developments necessary for program completion

 
 

Shackleton Energy Engineering Development

The Shackleton Energy team has been developing foundational technologies that teach us how to finance, organize,
build and lead the greatest expansion of the frontier in the history of humanity

 
 
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Power Transmission


POWER TRANSMISSION

Power Transmission


POWER TRANSMISSION

Shackleton Energy has, over the past eight years, developed a radical new method for the non-line-of-sight transmission of very large amounts of power.   The concept is the subject of several patents-pending and involves the injection of a high energy laser beam into a special glass fiber that is deployed from mobile vehicles using an onboard spooler.  The power is received at the vehicle and converted to electrical power using an array of novel energy exchange mechanisms (the direct coherent beam can also be used at the vehicle along with waste heat).  The technology is known by its project name:  VALKYRIE.  VALKYRIE was used in June of 2014 to propel the deepest cryobot mission yet recorded into an ice shelf.  Significant amounts of power -- on the order of megawatts -- can be transferred using the VALKYRIE technology to points more than 40 kilometers from a point of entry with the potential of extension to as much as 100 kilometers. The successful field test of VALKYRIE represents the emergence of a disruptive technology in which autonomous agents, now free of battery-life constraints, may perform persistent science and industrial processing at locations previously inaccessible.  The implications of this technology to SEC lunar crater operations are myriad.

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Hyperbaric Ops


HYPERBARIC OPS
 

Hyperbaric Ops


HYPERBARIC OPS
 

Shackleton Energy (SEC) has a deep legacy of more than 27 years of manned-ops experience with placing crews under pressure and with the design of pressurized habitats (inflatable and rigid) and decompression and recompression procedures.  SEC maintains expertise in the management of human crews in pressurized habitats including ingress, egress, and capsule transfer of crews under pressure, as well as the design of pressure hulls (inflatable and rigid) and lock out redundancy systems, all of which are directly applicable to the design of LEO and lunar pressurized habitats as well as human-rated orbital transfer vehicles.  SEC has extensive expertise in real-time decompression engine and decompression planning tool development that is directly applicable to EVA decompression management.  SEC team members have been responsible for handling scores of capsule transfer operations including many underwater exploration EVA missions lasting in excess of 22 hours (and including up to 17 hours of decompression).

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GNC


GN&C SYSTEMS

GNC


GN&C SYSTEMS

Shackleton Energy has more than 20 years of operational experience in the design, integration, test, and fielding of advanced guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) systems.  SEC specializes in multi-stage Kalman filter systems that employ a wide array of navigational inputs - -from GPS, IMU, FOG gyros, ring laser gyros, MEMS gyros, digital compass, velocity, doppler, pressure, slant range and heading, optical, laser radar, lidar, acoustic, altimeters, SAR, radar, and more.  We design highly redundant systems for survival in hostile environments.  Our design team handles all levels of implementation from desktop and laptop prototyping systems to industrial board stacks and custom embedded systems including ASICs and FPGAs.  We design our own embedded systems.   We specialize in the tight integration of large intelligent sensor networks driving distributed intelligent, redundant actuator systems (thrusters, engines, reaction control, attitude control) and have an extensive library of debugged real-time autonomous system control code for operation of free flying systems operating in all six degrees-of-freedom (x,y,z, roll, pitch, yaw).  

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Life Support


LIFE SUPPORT
 

Life Support


LIFE SUPPORT
 

The Shackleton Energy core team has literally “written the book” on the general use of long range, redundant computer-controlled closed cycle portable life support systems (PLSS) in hostile environments.  During the past 30 years SEC founders have been involved in the development of seven generations of fully closed cycle electronically controlled underwater life support apparatus.  The Mk7 (aka “Se7eN”) is a commercially available recreational diving unit weighing 15 kg with a range of 6 hours at 60m depth.  More than 3,000 units have been manufactured and sold by Poseidon Diving Systems, Sweden as of 2014 under license.  From the very start SEC founders realized that existing space systems EVA PLSS units were unsafe for long range, remote missions.  Beginning in 1984 design efforts began to develop a 2-day PLSS that was completely redundant and would allow for bailout in closed circuit operation -- something no space suit (government or private) has ever achieved. SEC developed an original design that included twin gas processors, four onboard computers, and the ability to manually cross connect the two halves of the system in the event of emergencies underwater.  It weighed 100 kg and had a range of 48 hours.  This was used dramatically on December 3 and 4 of 1987 when SEC co-founder Dr. Stone spent 24 hours continuously underwater using the prototype device.  Over the following 27 years the system was continuously improved upon.  Tens of thousands of missions (underwater dives) have been logged all over the world -- proof enough that the architecture works and is reliable for general use, but also that the 150,000 lines of onboard code that runs the core systems is fully debugged.  A fully redundant version of the Se7eN system employs full closed-cycle bailout capability and a 12 hour range... far greater than any existing spacesuit PLSS, along with onboard real-time decompression management, consumables supervisor, head-up displays, and manual override capability.  In short, it is designed for long range industrial operations with direct implications for both ECLSS and EVA PLSS space systems that SEC will develop as part of its LEO and lunar operations equipment.

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Autonomous Robots


AUTONOMOUS ROBOTS

Autonomous Robots


AUTONOMOUS ROBOTS

Shackleton Energy has over 20 years experience in the design, fabrication, integration, test and field deployment of fully autonomous mobility systems (UGVs, AUVs, HROVs, RVs) for use on the surface, underground, underwater, and in space.   SEC has pioneered the development of autonmous systems to enable a full scale Europa lander-ice-penetration-AUV life search mission:  what many consider to be the most ambitious robotics development project ever undertaken.  A string of dramatic field demonstrations with vehicles like DEPTHX, ENDURANCE, and VALKYRIE have proved the viability of behavior-based programming to handle unstructured problems in navigation, obstacle avoidance, rendezvous and docking, search for microbial life, exploration and mapping, 3D-feature-based navigation, and sample site selection, all without human intervention.  SEC has developed hundreds of thousands of lines of debugged modular autonomous behavior code.  Large portions of these modules are being re-used for ground breaking new projects at SEC  like ARTEMIS (the first long range autonomous vehicle to explore under the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica),  SpaceBrake (SEC’s program for on-demand reentry systems), and SEC’s on-orbit and lunar ops habitats and orbital transfer systems.

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Reentry


RE-ENTRY SYSTEMS

Reentry


RE-ENTRY SYSTEMS

Shackleton Energy has more than 30 years of experience designing and deploying space systems -- from small sat design and launch to directing a dedicated shuttle mission.  SEC has, as part of its business architecture, developed novel concepts for on-demand reentry from orbit, ranging from cubesat recovery systems to orbital lifeboats to industrial aerobrakes capable of returning 100 ton payloads from the moon to LEO.  With our spacebrake technology we will first explore small payload recovery, then as confidence and capability grows, ramp up to much larger downmass systems over time.  Eventually, this technology will enable SEC to demonstrate on–demand recovery of SEC crewmembers from space either for contingencies or special operations.  These larger, much more capable orbital lifeboats––called Assured Crew Recovery Return Vehicles (ACRVs)––will become the lifeblood of SEC commercial propellant depot operations in space for our crews and provide support to other participating spacefarers who do not have readily available means of on-demand return to Earth. This will also be a critical enabler to pave the way for very large aerobraking systems that will be required to economically fly water in our transporters from the Moon to our fuel depots in low Earth orbit (LEO).